Dennis Quaid & The Sharks

with The Blitz Brothers

Sat Sep 9

Dennis Quaid & The Sharks

with The Blitz Brothers

Doors: 7:30 pm
Start: 9:00 pm
Age: Ages 21+ Only
Price:$30

Best known as an actor, Quaid writes songs and performs with his band The Sharks. But make no mistake, the band has long been performing to rave review and Quaid is not another actor turned rocker--he's a bonafide rock star.

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Event Information

Best known as a actor, in his spare time Quaid writes songs and performs with his band The Sharks. But make no mistake, the bands has long been performing to rave review, and Quaid is not just another actor turned rocker – he’s a bonafide rock star.


Genre: rock


Ticket Price: $30 advanced & day of show


PARKING: Street parking and paid lot parking available.


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Dennis Quaid & The Sharks

Dennis Quaid and The Sharks have been performing in front of thousands of people receiving rave reviews. He is not just another actor turned rock star, he is a rock star.

Dennis Quaid is the lead singer and rhythm guitarist. He performs many original plus classic hits such as "Spill the Wine", "Gloria", and many more.

The band's origins can be traced to one night when Quaid went to see actor Harry Dean Stanton and his longtime band (appropriately named the Harry Dean Stanton Band) perform at an L.A. club. Quaid was invited to join the band onstage. At first reluctant because of his decade long layoff from music, Quaid finally did perform with the band and was successful enough that James, also a member of Stanton's band, approached Quaid about starting a group of their own.

James quickly began recruiting others for the band and it wasn't long before Dennis Quaid & the Sharks, which specializes in "rock 'n' roll and country-soul," was performing at L.A. clubs. The band even throws in a Jerry Lee Lewis song or two in the mix, such as "Great Balls of Fire," which Quaid has firsthand experience performing, having played "The Killer" in a 1989 biopic.

Quaid said the shows are as much fun for those in attendance as they are for the band. "(The audiences) have a blast, which is all we want," he said. "I make a complete and utter fool of myself. I think that's the only way to have fun (onstage), instead of trying to pretend to be cool and all the rest of that stuff."

The Blitz Brothers

The Blitz Brothers were a popular rock band who frequently opened for touring headliners in the 1970s and 1980s. Richard “Blitz” Livoni began playing guitar at the age of eight and continued through college, eventually opening for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Hoyt Axton, Tim Buckley, Jackson Browne, Linda Rondstadt, and others.

“I hated electric guitars when I was a little kid,” says Livoni. He liked jug bands. “Kazoos and shit.”

But when the Animals released “House of the Rising Sun” in the 1960s, Livoni says he went out and rented an electric guitar and amplifier. He taught himself to play Paul Butterfield’s East-West and every track on John Mayall’s Blues Breakers album as well. “I became a victim of the Jimi-Jeff-Clapton syndrome.” He laughs.

Livoni was playing in an Orange County band called Fast Eddie when he left them to start the Blitz Brothers in 1973. The original members were Livoni, Jamison, and a former Mickey Mouse Club Mouseketeer on drums and vocals named Dickie Dodd, a former member of the Standells who sang their big hit “Dirty Water.”

The Blitz Brothers made their name at L.A. clubs like Gazzarri’s, the Starwood, and the Pasadena Hilton. “Van Halen was our competition.”

By the time the Blitz Brothers migrated south to San Diego venues such as the Spirit Club, Ledbetter’s, the Palace, and Neutral Ground, Livoni had gained a reputation as a blistering-hot guitarist.

When Livoni shuttered the Blitz Brothers in 1986 (“One reason was that nightclubs weren’t drawing because of changes in the liquor laws”), he needed a job. “I put an ad in the Reader advertising myself as a recording engineer and I’ve been booked steadily ever since.”

The first Blitz Studio was in the basement of his home in Mission Hills. Blitz went on to record bands and write music in a private stand-alone state-of-the-art digital studio in south Mission Hills on Reynard Way, as well as playing with Sons of Edison.

A quarter century after they split, the band reunited on August 7, 2011, at Winston’s in OB. Why start over? The answer, Livoni says, is Barney Roach. “Being the big daddy of the band was no fun.” Roach, who will fill the spot once occupied by Danny (Jamison) Blitz on bass guitar, is the new hustle behind the organizing of gigs and rehearsals and all of the day-to-day tedium, says Livoni, that goes with running a band.

What’s in it for Roach? “I get to be in a band with one of my all-time guitar idols,” he says.

After the band reunited with Livoni and founding drummer Dickie Dodd, keyboardist Rick Randle was added to the lineup in early 2013. Livoni underwent an emergency surgical procedure on June 20 of that year, after suffering retinal detachment.