Allah-Las

with Entrance

Wed Oct 18

Allah-Las

with Entrance

Doors: 8:00 pm
Start: 9:00 pm
Age: Ages 18+ Only
Price:$18-$20

Hit singles "Catamaran" and "Long Journey" combine pop elements of the British Invasion and West Coast psychedelic with the raw swagger of American garage rockers.

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Event Information

Hit singles "Catamaran" and "Long Journey" combine pop elements of the British Invasion and West Coast psychedelic with the raw swagger of American garage rockers. 


Genre: garage rock / surf rock


Ticket Price: $18 advanced / $20 day of show


PARKING: Street parking and paid lot parking available.


TABLE RESERVATION / VIP: vip@musicboxsd.com / (619) 836-1847


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CASBAH PRESENTS

Allah-Las

Allah-Las formed in Los Angeles in 2008 around a mutual love for records, Los Angeles history, and the beach. They are all surfers and cover the city from the East Side (Mt. Washington) to way out West (Venice Beach) - and their sound reflects the geography of the city. The group consists of Miles Michaud, singer and guitarist, Pedrum Siadatian, electric guitar and vocals, Spencer Dunham, Electric Bass and vocals, and Matthew Correia, drums, percussion and vocals.Since coming together as a band, they have cut their teeth playing numerous California dates with groups like Entrance Band, Tyde, Tijuana Panthers, and the Growlers, and have garnered the approval of original UK Psych founding-father Patrick Campbell-Lyons (Nirvana). In the Los Angeles musical community, they have gained a reputation as a laid-back, grooving band with strong ties to the authentically LA-centric sounds of bands like the Byrds, Love, and early Captain Beefheart.

Entrance

Book of Changes, the new album by Guy Blakeslee as
ENTRANCE, is a poetic song cycle about the seasons of
the heart, tracing an emotional journey through longing
and emptiness to peace and redemption. The record
achieves a seamless melding of the personal, political and
philosophical, a vibrant document of an artist hitting a
creative stride and discovering an expansive new sound.
The adventurously produced collection of songs is
reminiscent of Townes Van Zandt’s ruminative lyricism
and the gypsy flavored orchestral explorations of Arthur
Lee and Love, uniquely channeled through Blakeslee’s 21st Century approach to the spiritual dimensions
of American songwriting in a way that gives an old form new power.
Book of Changes was written and recorded by Blakeslee over the course of a restless year of travel, touring
and transformation. The album took shape in 11 different studios in Los Angeles and London, produced by
Blakeslee and mixed by multi-instrumentalist David Vandervelde (Father John Misty, Jay Bennett) at Elliott
Smith’s New Monkey Studios in Van Nuys, California. Additional mixing came from Chris Coady (Future
Islands, Cass McCombs) who lent his talents to the song “Always the Right Time.” Grammy nominated
engineer Sarah Register (David Bowie, The Shins) mastered Book of Changes.
On the new recording, Blakeslee is joined by several very talented friends including longtime collaborator
Paz Lenchantin (Pixies, Silver Jews) and percussionist Frank Lenz (Pedro the Lion, The Weepies) as well as
vocalists Jessica Tonder and Lael Neale and the drummers Derek James and Will Scott. The accompanying
art by critically acclaimed artist Amanda Charchian captures Blakeslee with freshly blossomed orchids.
Strings, pianos, xylophones, bells and dreamy female voices swirl around fluid basslines and fingerpicked
acoustic guitars. At the heart of these songs is a voice, which holds an intensity of emotion that can only
come from the depths of the soul. From the devotional pop of “Always the Right Time” and the western
bolero of “I’d Be A Fool” through the stark blues of “The Avenue” and the dark romantic flamenco of “Molly,”
Blakeslee’s singing carries the narrative with heart-stopping force. Each unfolding chapter touches a new
emotional nerve, from the Lee and Nancy style sway of “Winter Lady” and the apocalyptic film noir piano
dirge “Leaving California” to the anthemic album closer “Revolution Eyes,” which dissolves in a stormy
melt of piano and bells as the listener is swept away on an ecstatic wave of liberation and joy. While at
moments the ghost of rock ’n’ roll is invoked, for the most part this is something more fragile and ethereal;
music from a half-remembered dream, strange and familiar at the same time.
When asked about the impetus for the new sound and style, Blakeslee replied:
“I desperately wanted to get back to the essential nature of ‘SONG’ - as opposed to a ‘track’… Most music
that is released nowadays is really a track, not a song - it would be impossible for one person with an
instrument to sit down in a room and perform it… So it was important that this album begin from actual
songs that I could sing with a guitar or a piano… all of the textures and sounds I added along the way are
the icing on the cake to expand the experience for the listener, but at the heart is a real song, a basic text of
words and a melody. I want to do my part to see that tradition isn’t lost. I believe there’s still a lot of power
in a song.”